Eerder praatte Nouveau je al bij over #sharethemicnow, de hashtag waaronder witte vrouwen met een groot bereik hun Instagram een dag overdragen aan een vrouw van kleur, om haar  verhaal een groter podium te bieden. Doel is luisteren, van elkaar leren en verbinding zoeken.

Article continues after the ad

Julia Roberts gaf haar Insta aan haar vriendin Kahlana Barfield Brow die werkt als fashion en beauty editor en bij wie innerlijke schoonheid zeker zo zwaar telt als de buitenkant.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Today, I’m taking over the Instagram of the beautiful @juliaroberts ♥️ I met Julia when I was an assistant at InStyle and I can’t tell you how many times, over the years, I’ve been awestruck by how amazing of a human being she is. There are many stories, but one I will never forget is the first time I covered the red carpet at the Oscars. I was young and terrified to approach celebs for a moment of their time, but it was my job to track down every award winner for an interview after the ceremony. Julia literally held my hand, walked me around, and introduced me to all of her friends so they would talk to me. That’s who she is. More importantly, Julia has always been about the fight for racial justice. Time and time again she has showed up for #BlackLivesMatter, and today she’s sharing the mic with me. #ShareTheMicNow

Een bericht gedeeld door Kahlana Barfield Brown (@kahlanabarfield) op

Dit is haar verhaal.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Hello! @kahlanabarfield here. A little background on me: I’m a wife. Mother. Sister. Seattleite. Beauty and fashion editor + brand consultant. For over a decade, I worked in publishing as an editor at InStyle where I began my work advocating for diversity and inclusion within the beauty and fashion space, which later transitioned into my eager efforts of having important dialogue with my audience and executives across the brand landscape. • As a Howard University grad, I make a concerted effort to use my platform to bring awareness to the importance of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and the pivotal role they play in preparing black college students to make positive contributions to society and our country as a whole. • Throughout my career, I’ve used my platform both in print on online to share black stories and I’m so thankful to my dear friend Julia for lending her platform to me today to expand the reach of those stories a bit more. The more we hear each other, the more we bridge the gaps between communities that can feel so divided. Stay tuned. #ShareTheMicNow

Een bericht gedeeld door Julia Roberts (@juliaroberts) op

 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The past 2 weeks have been overwhelming to say the least. For 8 minutes and 43 seconds, the world watched as a white police officer kneeled on the neck of a black man as he literally begged for his life. On a human level, the death of #GeorgeFloyd was excruciating to watch, particularly as a Black person. But the most recent incident wasn’t the first. The violent deaths of #BreonnaTaylor, #AhmaudArbery and countless others have put a global spotlight on systemic racism in America. Now, it seems the world is listening. Martin Luther King said “Riots are the language of the unheard.” We’re watching people around the entire world stand together as a unified front. Not for black against white. Or civilians against cops. But fighting for what’s right. Together. Next is the most critical stage — ACTION. We must continue to educate ourselves and contribute to the fight against police brutality and systemic racism. I will be posting a list of reading materials, organizations to support, etc. to Julia’s stories that can be helpful in bringing about positive change. — @kahlanabarfield #ShareTheMicNow

Een bericht gedeeld door Julia Roberts (@juliaroberts) op

 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Motherhood is one of the most incredible experiences in life. With a 3-year old daughter and one in the oven, I can’t ignore the fact that Black maternal death rates are astronomically high in this country, a public health issue steeped in racism. Black women are 243% more likely to die during their pregnancy or birth compared to white women. Black infants are also 2x more likely to die by their first birthday. While the stats are scary, especially for a Black mother like myself, remember that race is not a risk factor for death. Our lived experiences in our bodies and chronic confrontations with racism leave us vulnerable to disparate outcomes from health inequities to a lack of access to care. Since racism is part and parcel of being black in America, many women suffer in silence, never revealing their stories of traumatic birth or frank mistreatment and disregard by medical personnel. We all have a right to freedom from discrimination and bias while birthing our children. As a collective voice, we can demand that racism in healthcare be dismantled. So where do we start? 1 - Let's work to dismantle racism within our family and social circles. This means calling out bigoted thinking and white privilege on the spot, reminding people that we as a country are evolving past this archaic and dangerous way of thinking. 2 - Acknowledge the truth. Racism permeates the deepest core of our society, and lives are lost because of it. #BlackLivesMatter too. 3 - Show up and listen with compassion. If you’re reading this, you have already started this step. Please continue to do so within your social circles. 4 - Follow and support causes that are doing this work. I’m posting a list of Black doctors to follow and organizations working in the reproductive justice space (see Stories). — @kahlanabarfield #ShareTheMicNow

Een bericht gedeeld door Julia Roberts (@juliaroberts) op

 

 

Dit geweldige initiatief in diversiteit krijgt ook navolging in Nederland. Vanaf 17 juni stellen vrouwen als Lieke van Lexmond, Halina Reijn, Barbara Barend én Nouveau's hoofdredacteur Claudia Straatmans hun Instagram een dag ter beschikking aan the good of the Sisterhood. Je kunt de verhalen volgen op #sharethemicnownl